Changing the World $5 at a Time

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World Wildlife Fund

WWF's mission is to conserve nature and reduce the most pressing threats to the diversity of life on Earth, building a future in which people live in harmony with nature.

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September 4th is National Wildlife Day

National Wildlife Day encourages citizens to stand up and fight for those animals that need a voice, visit their local zoo more often, and donate to causes like the World Wildlife Fund.

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World Wildlife Fund

Your support truly makes a difference.

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How Your Support Makes A Difference

WWF has been part of successful wildlife recovery stories ranging from southern Africa’s black rhino to black bucks in the Himalayas. And this in turn is helping protect rich and varied ecosystems while ensuring people continue to benefit from nature.

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How Your Support Makes A Difference



WWF’s work has evolved from saving species and landscapes to addressing the larger global threats and forces that impact them. Recognizing that the problems facing our planet are increasingly more complex and urgent, we have refined the way in which we work around an ambitious new strategy. Our new strategy puts people at the center and organizes our work around six key areas: forests, marine, freshwater, wildlife, food and climate. By linking these six areas in an integrated approach, we can better leverage our unique assets and direct all our resources to protecting vulnerable places, species and communities worldwide.

But our work is far from done. Humans are behind the current rate of species extinction, which is at least 100–1,000 times higher than nature intended. WWF’s 2014 Living Planet Report found wildlife populations of vertebrate species—mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish—have declined by 52 percent over the last 40 years. And the impacts will reach far beyond the potential cultural loss of iconic species like tigers, rhinos and whales.

The good news is we’ve also seen what’s working. WWF has been part of successful wildlife recovery stories ranging from southern Africa’s black rhino to black bucks in the Himalayas. And this in turn is helping protect rich and varied ecosystems while ensuring people continue to benefit from nature.

This much is clear: we cannot afford to fail in our mission to save a living planet.

If you would like to see more success stories like this donate today.

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